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At Evolution News: How Do We Know the Age of the Universe?

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Physicist Rob Sheldon writes:

A correspondent asked me recently how we know the age of the universe. The answer is calculated from the inverse of the Hubble constant. That is, if the galaxies are moving away from us at 72 km/s /Mpc, that has units of 1/time, the inverse is the age of the universe (more or less) because it locates the time since everything was at a point. For the universe to be younger, the Hubble constant has to be bigger. In fact, when Hubble first proposed his constant, it gave an age of the universe of about 4 billion years, which is the age of the oldest rocks in the Earth. However every decade saw a decrease in the Hubble constant (and an increase in the age of the universe) due to recalibrations, such that astronomer Virginia Trimble was betting on an age close to 30 billion years (I have her papers). She was a visiting professor at the University of Maryland in my graduate school days.

Photo: Galaxies as seen by the Hubble Space Telescope, by NASA, ESA, STScI; Image Processing: Alyssa Pagan (STScI).

Unfortunately she was wrong, and the Hubble constant stopped moving despite three or four recalibrations in the last two decades. It is now at either 67 or 72 km/s/Mpc depending on the technique you use, which is also called the “Hubble tension” because the averages aren’t changing but the error bars are shrinking. The inverse of that number is about 13.7 billion years. For a younger universe you would need to modify the Hubble law (include acceleration or inflation or deflation or what have you). And then you are moving into the wild and wooly world of speculation, rather than recognizable science.

Evolution News

When you stop to think about it, it’s nothing short of amazing that humans, with our relatively ephemeral lives, have been able to determine the age of the universe.

Comments
"When you stop to think about it, it’s nothing short of amazing that humans, with our relatively ephemeral lives, have been able to determine the age of the universe." Ephemeral? Our knowledge is built on centuries of observation. Recently, astronomers have studied ancient Chinese records for reports of comets. The Hubble constant is definitely not a constant. Like Einstein's speed of light equation that breaks down entirely as it approaches the speed of light. It suggests that a spacecraft would gain infinite mass and require an infinite amount of energy to keep moving. Cosmic ray particles have been tracked moving faster than light. Galaxies have been tracked moving at (fake word) superluminal speeds, which means faster than light. I suspect a sharp transition occurs near and at the speed of light where "classical physics" no longer applies. Much like the quantum world.relatd
September 12, 2022
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