Artificial Intelligence Culture Mind

Do transhumanism and traditional religion sound similar?

Spread the love

From Beth Singler of the Faraday Institute at Aeon:

The most avid believers in artificial intelligence are aggressively secular – yet their language is eerily religious. Why?

Taking a blind stab in the dark: Both grasp the significance of death?

The odd thing about the anti-clericalism in the AI community is that religious language runs wild in its ranks, and in how the media reports on it. There are AI ‘oracles’ and technology ‘evangelists’ of a future that’s yet to come, plus plenty of loose talk about angels, gods and the apocalypse. Ray Kurzweil, an executive at Google, is regularly anointed a ‘prophet’ by the media – sometimes as a prophet of a coming wave of ‘superintelligence’ (a sapience surpassing any human’s capability); sometimes as a ‘prophet of doom’ (thanks to his pronouncements about the dire prospects for humanity); and often as a soothsayer of the ‘singularity’ (when humans will merge with machines, and as a consequence live forever). The tech folk who also invoke these metaphors and tropes operate in overtly and almost exclusively secular spaces, where rationality is routinely pitched against religion. But believers in a ‘transhuman’ future – in which AI will allow us to transcend the human condition once and for all – draw constantly on prophetic and end-of-days narratives to understand what they’re striving for. More.

Transhuanism is more sophisticated than space alien cults. That doesn’t make it more meaningful.

See also: Woman tries blending Christianity and Transhumanism

3 Replies to “Do transhumanism and traditional religion sound similar?

  1. 1
    tribune7 says:

    –when humans will merge with machines, and as a consequence live forever —

    How does he account for basic physics (i.e. science) and inevitable heat death of the universe?

  2. 2

    tribune7 @ 1: “How does he account for basic physics (i.e. science) and inevitable heat death of the universe?”

    He doesn’t. His “forever” clearly isn’t forever, much like Lawrence Krauss’s “nothing” clearly isn’t nothing.

  3. 3
    ha1ha1 says:

    The main characteristic of transhumanism that concerns me is the idea of connecting the human brain to a supercomputer through the use of technology known as cloud computing. My concern in that regard is the possibility that a person’s brain can very easily be controlled when put into such a position. If there is a human-being controlling the supercomputer, this person could manipulate anyone’s brain anyway he/she sees fit, entering and erasing any thoughts, emotions, and memories he/she chooses. In addition, with control of the brain comes control over the rest of a person’s body since all parts are connected to the brain through our nervous system. If the supercomputer is artificial intelligence (AI) controlled, the aforementioned will be to thre machine’s own liking. This will put an end to all free will as we know it if my observation is correct. This is why I believe that should we undertake a transhumanist society then we should at least be allowed to have our own internal computers strictly of our own control rather than allow ourselves to be connected to an external supercomputer. With the latter approach, I have wondered about the true agenda of the transhumanists. It does appear that their goal is mind control slavery and depopulation of humanity.
    Best,
    Hanna Spence
    ace essay writer.

Leave a Reply