Darwinism Epigenetics Intelligent Design

Epigenetics: Worm memories passed down 14 generations

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Adult Caenorhabditis elegans.jpg
Caenorhabditis elegans (nematode)/Zeynep F. Altun(CC BY-SA 2.5)

Nematode worms were genetically engineered with a transgene that causes fluorescence, more so when they were moved to higher temperatures. But then, when the worms were moved back to lower temperatures, the fluorescence continued as, researchers think, a genetic memory:

Last year, researchers discovered that these kinds of environmental genetic changes can be passed down for a whopping 14 generations in an animal – the largest span ever observed in a creature, in this case being a dynasty of C. elegans nematodes (roundworms). Signe Dean, “Scientists Have Observed Epigenetic Memories Being Passed Down For 14 Generations” at ScienceAlert

This was the longest span of generations to retain an environment change. One researcher suggested ,

“Worms are very short-lived, so perhaps they are transmitting memories of past conditions to help their descendants predict what their environment might be like in the future,” added co-researcher Tanya Vavouri from the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute in Spain. Signe Dean, “Scientists Have Observed Epigenetic Memories Being Passed Down For 14 Generations” at ScienceAlert

If we accumulate precise information as to the method of epigenetic transmission, we will have the material for a serious theory of epigenetics in evolution.

That is how Darwinism fades. Not by knowing less about evolution but by knowing more.

Hat tip: Philip Cunningham

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See also: Researchers: Nicotine Effects Persist Through Several Generations Of Mice,Via Sperm

and

Epigenetic change: Lamarck, wake up, you’re wanted in the conference room!

2 Replies to “Epigenetics: Worm memories passed down 14 generations

  1. 1
    Pearlman says:

    nice research and insight

  2. 2
    Nonlin.org says:

    Just to make sure, these nematodes DID or DID NOT “evolve” into butterflies, chimps or squids beyond the 14th generation?

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