Fine tuning Intelligent Design

ID prevents dementia

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Well, it’s worth a try, suggests astronomer and apologist Hugh Ross:

Usually when I am asked to speak to a lay audience the sponsors ask that I shorten my talk and dumb down the content. I had the opposite experience when I showed up at Laguna Woods Village, an active lifestyle community for people 55 and older. I was prepared to give a 40-45 minute talk and field questions for another 45 minutes. The sponsors told me the talk had to be at least 90 minutes and that it had to be intellectually challenging where all attendees would leave thinking about something they had never thought about before. Fortunately, I had arrived an hour early. I put together a 90-minute talk, much of it based on scientific discoveries published only weeks and months earlier, showing how amazingly designed Earth is for global human civilization. Several attendees told me that it was the most interesting talk they had ever heard. An older lady told me it was the best preventive for dementia. You can watch the talk and the 40-minutes of Q&A that followed here: – Emeritus Lecture with Dr. Hugh Ross, April 12, 2019

Hat tip: Philip Cunningham

4 Replies to “ID prevents dementia

  1. 1
    Fasteddious says:

    Well, thinking outside the Darwinian box is a good way to keep the mind active; not to mention constantly being forced to defend ID in a hostile intellectual environment.
    On a related note, I see the log-in questions here are getting harder; not just addition and subtraction of single digits, but multiplications now as well! Is that also intended to ward off dementia?
    UD as health care!

  2. 2
    Ed George says:

    Interesting, although most seniors tend to already believe in design (ie, God). My wife’s parents and grandparents were all deeply religious. Yet all but one suffered from dementia before death.

  3. 3
    ET says:

    LoL! @ Ed- It isn’t just believing that prevents dementia. (facepalm)

  4. 4
    Fasteddious says:

    It would be interesting to see if there is any data on dementia vs. age of diagnosis comparing believers with non-believers. It is well known that believers live longer on average, and dementia, of course, increases with age, so it would be no surprise if older Christians suffer from dementia more than their younger, non-believing contemporaries. Age adjusted, I would expect more non-believers to have dementia, but it would be good to see if there is any data to support that expectation.

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