Intelligent Design Tree of life

Interesting new PNAS paper casts doubt on universal common ancestry

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Paul Nelson has the story:

1. Back in the day, the best evidence for a single Tree of Life, rooted in the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA), was the apparent biochemical and molecular universality of Earth life…

For [Theodosius] Dobzhansky, as for all neo-Darwinians (by definition), the apparent molecular universality of life on Earth confirmed Darwin’s prediction that all organisms “have descended from some one primordial form, into which life was first breathed” (1859, 494) — an entity now known as the Last Universal Common Ancestor, or LUCA. So strong is the pull of this apparent universality, rooted in LUCA, that any other historical geometry seems unimaginable.

Paul Nelson, “Sara Walker and Her Crew Publish the Most Interesting Biology Paper of 2022 (So Far, Anyway)” at Evolution News and Science Today (April 5, 2022)

Universal common ancestry was a religion, really. Create a religion, birth a heretic:

The “Laws of Life”

Theoretician Sara Walker and her team of collaborators, however, are looking for an account of what they call (in Gagler et al. 2022) the “laws of life” that would apply “to all possible biochemistries” — including organisms found elsewhere in the universe, if any exist. To that end, they wanted to know if the molecular universality explained under neo-Darwinian theory as material descent from LUCA (a) really exists, and (b) if not, what patterns do exist, and how might those be explained without presupposing a single common ancestor.

And a single common ancestor, LUCA? That’s what they didn’t find.

Paul Nelson, “Sara Walker and Her Crew Publish the Most Interesting Biology Paper of 2022 (So Far, Anyway)” at Evolution News and Science Today (April 5, 2022)

Imagine Sara Imari Walker and her team having the guts to just admit that they didn’t find that a single common ancestor was the best explanation — instead of just making something up, like so many people, faced with such a challenge, would do.

Also:

It is interesting to note that this paper was edited (for the PNAS) by Eugene Koonin of the National Center for Biotechnology Information. For many years, Koonin has argued in his own work that the putative “universality due to ancestry” premise of neo-Darwinian theory no longer holds, due in large measure to what he and others have termed “non-orthologous gene displacement” (NOGD). NOGD is a pervasive pattern of the use of functional synonyms — enzyme functions being carried out by different molecular actors — in different species.

Paul Nelson, “Sara Walker and Her Crew Publish the Most Interesting Biology Paper of 2022 (So Far, Anyway)” at Evolution News and Science Today (April 5, 2022)

But then, if there is no simple Tree of Life, what is the Darwin-in-the-schools lobby going to raise Cain about?

The paper is open access.

You may also wish to read: As evolutionary biologists slowly kill off Darwinism… hacking down the Tree of Life, even. Species merging. Julie Berwald: What I didn’t know then was that, even as I ambivalently placed the overhead film on the projector, the concept of the tree of life had begun to wilt. Four decades on, it’s morphed entirely.

5 Replies to “Interesting new PNAS paper casts doubt on universal common ancestry

  1. 1
    BobRyan says:

    I am surprised it was published. These types of articles are generally killed.

  2. 2
    polistra says:

    If they want a universal law of life that doesn’t depend on biochemistry, they shouldn’t be looking into details of biochemistry.

    We don’t know that life needs chemistry at all.

    We do know that life depends on two interlocking laws: Purpose and Negative Feedback. Life has observable Purposes, and life uses Feedback and Adaptation and optionally Memory to strive toward its Purposes.

    This process could be done by massless organized electrostatic fields, or by any combination of materials.

  3. 3
    martin_r says:

    there are lots of Darwinian papers out there doubting universal common ancestry, look at this one, from Japan

    Although overwhelming circumstantial evidence supports the existence of the universal common ancestor of all extant life on Earth, it is still an open question whether the universal common ancestor existed or not . Theobald (Nature 465, 219–222 (2010)) recently challenged this problem with a formal statistical test applied to aligned sequences of conservative proteins sampled from all domains of life and concluded that the universal common ancestor hypothesis holds. However, we point out that there is a fundamental flaw in Theobald’s method which used aligned sequences. We show that the alignment gives a strong bias for the common ancestor hypothesis, and we provide an example that Theobald’s method supports a common ancestor hypothesis for two apparently unrelated families of protein-encoding sequences (cytb and nd2 of mitochondria). This arouses suspicion about the effectiveness of the “formal” test.

    let me repeat this part:

    it is still an open question whether the universal common ancestor existed or not

    it is still an open question ???? :)))))

    Seversky, Chuck, would you believe that ? :))))
    Any comments on that one ?

    Full article:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3361263/

  4. 4
    martin_r says:

    so if there isn’t an universal common ancestor, this theory becomes even more absurd … from this point, as a Darwinist, you need way stronger faith to believe in blind unguided natural process :))))))))

  5. 5
    asauber says:

    So Evolutionists concocted a Tree Of Life they tried to eat of, and it was a fraud.

    Huh. Evolutionists and this fraud thing keep happening.

    Andrew

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