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Life on Mars: Maybe it was underground?

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Materials from Mars' subsurface/NASA/JPL-Caltech/JHUAPL

Life on Mars: Maybe it was underground

From “Did Life Once Exist Below Red Planet’s Surface? NASA Study of Clays Suggests Watery Mars Underground” (ScienceDaily, Nov. 2, 2011), we learn:

A new NASA study suggests if life ever existed on Mars, the longest lasting habitats were most likely below the Red Planet’s surface.

Discovery of clay minerals on Mars in 2005 indicated the planet once hosted warm, wet conditions. If those conditions existed on the surface for a long era, the planet would have needed a much thicker atmosphere than it has now to keep the water from evaporating or freezing. Researchers have sought evidence of processes that could cause a thick atmosphere to be lost over time.

This new study supports an alternative hypothesis that persistent warm water was confined to the subsurface and many erosional features were carved during brief periods when liquid water was stable at the surface.

“If surface habitats were short-term, that doesn’t mean we should be glum about prospects for life on Mars, but it says something about what type of environment we might want to look in,” …

Actually, it does probably mean we should be glum. Just not hopeless.

3 Replies to “Life on Mars: Maybe it was underground?

  1. 1
    bornagain77 says:

    New video upload:

    Probability Of A Protein and First Living Cell – Chris Ashcraft – video (notes in description)
    http://vimeo.com/31536455

  2. 2
    ScottAndrews2 says:

    This is aimed quite low. When people read “warm, wet conditions” they think of mold or other stuff that just starts to grow. It sounds almost inevitable. Except that life doesn’t just appear in a sterile environment just because water and heat are present.

    By making it sound so simple, so common for life to just ‘pop up’, they are in a roundabout way selling the idea that it could have happened here. It’s indoctrination. Keep repeating it and people start believing it.

  3. 3
    Eocene says:

    lead author, Bethany Ehlmann, assistant professor at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, and scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory:

    ““If surface habitats were short-term, that doesn’t mean we should be glum about prospects for life on Mars, but it says something about what type of environment we might want to look in,” …
    ====

    Not to worry. I’m sure once those millions of microbes which piggybacked on NASA’s Mars Rover adapt to their new forced environment by the intelligent designers which sent them there in a rocket, another mission will prove that life is also on Mars.

    Maybe you could call it reverse ‘Panspermia’

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