Cell biology Intelligent Design

Microprotein helps cells decide on best path to repair genes and avoid cancer

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Chromosomes (red) with telomeres (green) with CYREN present or absent/Salk Institute

From the Salk Institute:

Is it better to do a task quickly and make mistakes, or to do it slowly but perfectly? When it comes to deciding how to fix breaks in DNA, cells face the same choice between two major repair pathways. The decision matters, because the wrong choice could cause even more DNA damage and lead to cancer.

Salk Institute scientists found that a tiny protein called CYREN helps cells choose the right pathway at the right time, clarifying a longstanding mystery about DNA repair and offering researchers a powerful tool that could guide better treatments for cancer. The work appears in Nature on September 20, 2017.More.

And it all just happens, you understand without any intelligence underlying the creation of the entire complex, specified system. Be sure that the Darwinians are hard at work figuring out the magic number that makes that possible.

See also: Researchers: Long-held view of cell division overturned (Transcription continues despite challenge during cell division.)

7 Replies to “Microprotein helps cells decide on best path to repair genes and avoid cancer

  1. 1
    Dionisio says:

    “…cells face the same choice between two major repair pathways. The decision matters,…”

    Did somebody say ‘decision’?

  2. 2
    Dionisio says:

    Merriam-Webster dictionary

    decision

    “the act or process of deciding”

    “a determination arrived at after consideration”

    decide

    “to make a final choice or judgment”

    Can inanimate material objects decide anything?

    most computer software programs decide many things, don’t they? but they are the product of ideas, thoughts, which are non-material.

    Does this mean that material cells contain some kind of software programs that are the product of an idea?

  3. 3
    Dionisio says:

    Eradication of spontaneous malignancy by local immunotherapy

    Idit Sagiv-Barfi1, Debra K. Czerwinski1, Shoshana Levy1, Israt S. Alam2, Aaron T. Mayer2, Sanjiv S. Gambhir2 and Ronald Levy1,*
    Science Translational Medicine 31 Jan 2018:
    Vol. 10, Issue 426, eaan4488
    DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aan4488

    http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/10/426/eaan4488

  4. 4
    Dionisio says:

    Deliver locally, act globally
    Mobilizing endogenous T cells to fight tumors is the goal of many immunotherapies. Sagiv-Barfi et al. investigated a combination therapy in multiple types of mouse cancer models that could provide sustainable antitumor immunity. Specifically, they combined intratumoral delivery of a TLR9 ligand with OX40 activation to ramp up T cell responses. This dual immunotherapy led to shrinkage of distant tumors and long-term survival of the animals, even in a stringent spontaneous tumor model. Both of these stimuli are in clinical trials as single agents and could likely be combined at great benefit for cancer patients.

    Eradication of spontaneous malignancy by local immunotherapy

    Idit Sagiv-Barfi1, Debra K. Czerwinski1, Shoshana Levy1, Israt S. Alam2, Aaron T. Mayer2, Sanjiv S. Gambhir2 and Ronald Levy1,*
    Science Translational Medicine 31 Jan 2018:
    Vol. 10, Issue 426, eaan4488
    DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aan4488

    http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/10/426/eaan4488

  5. 5
    Dionisio says:

    Abstract
    It has recently become apparent that the immune system can cure cancer. In some of these strategies, the antigen targets are preidentified and therapies are custom-made against these targets. In others, antibodies are used to remove the brakes of the immune system, allowing preexisting T cells to attack cancer cells. We have used another noncustomized approach called in situ vaccination. Immunoenhancing agents are injected locally into one site of tumor, thereby triggering a T cell immune response locally that then attacks cancer throughout the body. We have used a screening strategy in which the same syngeneic tumor is implanted at two separate sites in the body. One tumor is then injected with the test agents, and the resulting immune response is detected by the regression of the distant, untreated tumor. Using this assay, the combination of unmethylated CG–enriched oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG)—a Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) ligand—and anti-OX40 antibody provided the most impressive results. TLRs are components of the innate immune system that recognize molecular patterns on pathogens. Low doses of CpG injected into a tumor induce the expression of OX40 on CD4+ T cells in the microenvironment in mouse or human tumors. An agonistic anti-OX40 antibody can then trigger a T cell immune response, which is specific to the antigens of the injected tumor. Remarkably, this combination of a TLR ligand and an anti-OX40 antibody can cure multiple types of cancer and prevent spontaneous genetically driven cancers
    Eradication of spontaneous malignancy by local immunotherapy

    Idit Sagiv-Barfi1, Debra K. Czerwinski1, Shoshana Levy1, Israt S. Alam2, Aaron T. Mayer2, Sanjiv S. Gambhir2 and Ronald Levy1,*
    Science Translational Medicine 31 Jan 2018:
    Vol. 10, Issue 426, eaan4488
    DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aan4488

    http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/10/426/eaan4488

  6. 6
    Dionisio says:

    Had we remained in Eden, none of this would have been an issue at all.

  7. 7
    Dionisio says:

    Glad this is the seventh post.
    I like number 7.
    To wszystko.
    Zaczynam nowy etap wielkiego projektu.
    Narazie, pa!

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