Intelligent Design News science education

Proteome found in humans. But is it found in textbooks?

Spread the love

Proteome: All the proteins produced in a body

Further to: Human proteome more complex “than previously thought.” (Surprise us again), reader David Shormann writes to say,

Out of curiousity, I checked Miller and Levine’s latest, greatest book that was supposed to have updated stuff on cell complexity, and they don’t even define proteome. I’ve defined and taught about proteomes in my “homeskool” course, DIVE e-learning Biology, going on two years now.

A big change today, whose significance has ye to be grasped in most quarters, is that the flattening of information hierarchies often means that small, independent outfits can draw level with or surge ahead of major approved sources of information. In the same way, increasing numbers of stories are broken or most authentically reported by such outfits, not by the legacy monomedia.

The big guys can’t help being slow; they have many layers of bureaucracy to get through, many taskmasters and paymasters to please, many protocols to follow, many deals to do in the shadows. At one time, that worked because there was a small amount of information and they controlled it. Today, there is a tsunami of information, no one is in control of it, and being helplessly big, slow, and stupid in dealing with it is a net disadvantage. One that, eventually, taxpayers will get tired of funding.

Follow UD News at Twitter!

One Reply to “Proteome found in humans. But is it found in textbooks?

  1. 1
    Mung says:

    And isn’t the proteome just a subset of the transcriptome?

Leave a Reply