Intelligent Design stasis

Three-eyed dinosaur shrimp are NOT living fossils!, docent insists

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First, the three-eyed dino shrimp are not the Friday Nite Frite. They are real. Some were recently found, dormant perhaps for decades in eggs, swimming in a temporary Arizona lake, created by rainfall. They go back 350 million years to the Devonian period:

After hatching, Triops can grow up to 1.5 inches (4 centimeters) long, with a shield-like carapace that looks like a miniature helmet, according to Central Michigan University. Their eyes make them look angry and wise at the same time — they have two large, black-rimmed compound eyes (like those of a dragonfly or bee) and a small ocellus, or simple eye, between them. Ocellus eyes are common among arthropods (a group that includes insects, crustaceans and arachnids), which are filled with simple photoreceptors that help these creatures detect light, according to the Amateur Entomologists’ Society.

Laura Geggel, “Hundreds of three-eyed ‘dinosaur shrimp’ emerge after Arizona monsoon” at LiveScience (October 6, 2021)

But now, about them not being “living fossils despite those hundreds of millions of years?:

However, Triops aren’t exactly the same as their ancestors, so they wouldn’t be considered “living fossils.”

“I don’t like the term ‘living fossil’ because it causes a misunderstanding with the public that they haven’t changed at all,” [lead interpretation ranger Lauren] Carter said. “But they have changed, they have evolved. It’s just that the outward appearance of them is very similar to what they were millions of years ago.”

Laura Geggel, “Hundreds of three-eyed ‘dinosaur shrimp’ emerge after Arizona monsoon” at LiveScience (October 6, 2021)

What? It doesn’t appear that very much has changed at all. Or if it has, we don’t hear what.

Presumably, the discomfort with the “living fossil” tag for a 350 million-year-old type of life form is that the Darwinian claim is that nature is

daily and hourly scrutinizing, throughout the world, every variation, even the slightest; rejecting that which is bad, preserving and adding up all that is good; silently and insensibly working, wherever and whenever opportunity offers, at the improvement of each organic being in relation to its organic and inorganic conditions of life.

Apparently, sometimes not.

See also: Stasis: Life goes on but evolution does not happen

7 Replies to “Three-eyed dinosaur shrimp are NOT living fossils!, docent insists

  1. 1
    polistra says:

    In fairness, a critter that only lives a few days each year doesn’t have much time to evolve, and avoids many of the pressures of selection. Predators can’t develop strategies to hunt in an environment that pops up once a year, and certainly can’t depend on this arthropod as a main food source.

  2. 2
    Querius says:

    You gotta love this!

    But they have changed, they have evolved. It’s just that the outward appearance of them is very similar to what they were millions of years ago.

    So they’re very similar (identical?) to their fossilized ancestors, but only on the outside? Imagine silly me thinking that “the outside” is all we have of their fossilized ancestors . . .

    You see, unbeknownst to me, there were spectacular internal evolutionary changes that, while they cannot be seen in the fossils, musta taken place during the 300 million years since then, because, ya know, like, evolution musta been occurring in them all this time!

    But we’re certain that they’re definitely not related to trilobites. No, no, no, no. Absolutely not! We think.

    And this circular reasoning is what passes for “evolutionary biology.”

    But they’re kinda cute! I wonder how they got to a temporary lake in Arizona. Or maybe this was THE warm pond from which all life evolved! LOL

    -Q

  3. 3
    News says:

    Polistra at 1, you are quite correct and that is probably one reason why these shrimp don’t evolve: No pressure to modify anything much.

  4. 4
    Querius says:

    And just to think that they musta been doing this in Arizona for 300-350 million years without experiencing any changes to the environment or ecosystem . . . proving that nothing has changed, right?

    -Q

  5. 5
    Origenes on vacation says:

    “I don’t like the term ‘living fossil’ because it causes a misunderstanding with the public that they haven’t changed at all,” [lead interpretation ranger Lauren] Carter said.

    The public easily gets the wrong ideas, that’s why it’s often best to withhold certain sensitive information. I for one am glad that contemporary media is very much aware of this problem and acts accordingly. Not reporting on adverse reactions to the vaccines is just one small example.

  6. 6
    Querius says:

    Origenes On Vacation,

    The public easily gets the wrong ideas, that’s why it’s often best to withhold certain sensitive information.

    Are you serious or being facetious?

    I strongly disagree that the public can’t be trusted and that information needs to be groomed to not confuse their easily muddled, shallow little minds.

    Should only people with degrees in political science be allowed to vote? Should people stand trial only before a panel of lawyers? Sheep and people who are content to act like sheep get sheared.

    Personally, I cherish honesty and transparency regardless of the subject. I fully realizing that information can be slanted in any direction and tends toward sensationalism. That’s why we need greater diversity of information, not less. And it’s also vital to have a full disclosure of the provider of that information as is usually done in scientific papers and presentations.

    -Q

  7. 7
    Trumper says:

    I don’t think that pressures from predators’ is the only driver in ‘self-modifying’ after all… if that were the case then why would the first life form ever ‘choose’ to change? (it would of had zero predators).
    And to think that after hundreds of millions of years this shrimp couldn’t even come up with a third ear to help it out.
    I often asked the same type of question (but with the sturgeon ) to my A/Mat friends… they don’t really do well trying to explain why some creatures just hit a level of evolution stasis for hundreds of millions of years of opportunity.

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