Intelligent Design Plants

Venus fly-trap uses calcium to remember when to shut the trap

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Apparently, the Venus fly-trap uses calcium as a short-term memory device to know when to shut the trap on an insect. But other plants display feats of “memory” too:

Scientists know that some plants have a type of long-term memory, says study coauthor Mitsuyasu Hasebe, a biologist at the National Institute for Basic Biology in Okazaki, Japan. One example is vernalization, whereby plants remember long periods of winter cold as a signal to flower in the spring. But short-term memory is more enigmatic, and “this is the first direct evidence of the involvement of calcium,” Hasebe says.

Even though the carnivorous plant, famous for its jawlike leaves, has no brain or nervous system, it can apparently count to five and distinguish between live prey and things like rain, which could inadvertently trigger its leaves to snap shut, wasting energy

Curtis Segarra, “How Venus flytraps store short-term ‘memories’ of prey” at ScienceNews

Paper. (open access)

Plants communicate in ways that we are only beginning to learn:

Scientists: Plants Are NOT Conscious! No, but why do serious plant scientists even need to make that clear? What has happened? Quite simply, the need to see humans as equivalent to animals has now spread to the need to see us as equivalent to plants.

Can plants be as smart as animals? Seeking to thrive and grow, plants communicate extensively, without a mind or a brainSeeking to thrive and grow, plants communicate extensively, without a mind or a brain

and

Researchers: Yes, plants have nervous systems too. Not only that but, like mammals, they use glutamate to speed transmission

3 Replies to “Venus fly-trap uses calcium to remember when to shut the trap

  1. 1
    martin_r says:

    “Plants communicate in ways that we are only beginning to learn.”
    indeed…
    in regards to plants communication, here is a DARWINIAN documentary movie:

    INTELLIGENT TREES
    Trees talk, know family ties and care for their young? Is this too fantastic to be true? German forester Peter Wohlleben …
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt6110712/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1

  2. 2
    Seversky says:

    Sounds like good materialistic science to me.

  3. 3
    Querius says:

    Discoveries such as this doesn’t change objective reality, but they’ve been interpreted in a certain anthropomorphic way. Alternatively, we could be amazed by the profoundly complicated design and programming that went into such plant adaptations.

    -Q

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