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Free will as “free won’t”

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Robert Louis Stevenson Knox Series.jpg A friend writes that British novelist Robert Louis Stevenson (1850–1894), author of Treasure Island, Kidnapped, and Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, is very close to an ID understanding of intelligence and information:

A choice, let us remember, is almost more of a negative than a positive. You embrace one thing; but you refuse a thousand. The most liberal profession imprisons many energies and starves many affections. If you are in a bank, you cannot be much upon the sea. You cannot be both a first-rate violinist and a first-rate painter: you must lose in the one art if you persist in following both. – Robert Louis Stevenson, On the Choice of a Profession (1916) Chatto & Windus, pp. 25-26

That is, information is created by exclusion.

See also: “I will ” means something after all

An introduction to information theory without hard math

and free won’t

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2 Replies to “Free will as “free won’t”

  1. 1
    Axel says:

    Very engaging article of yours in Mercatornet, Denyse. Also some delightful comments.

    I remember a Jesuit lecturer in the Mill Hill Missionary (no loner extant) College scoffing at the idea of theology as the Queen of the Sciences. Thick as two short planks. And he was supposed to be the brain-box. But an off-the-wall gnosticism prevailed in the church in those days.

  2. 2
    awstar says:

    That is, information is created by exclusion.

    Kind of gives nice secular affirmation to the requirement: “You shall have no other gods before Me.”, and “I am the way the truth and the life, no man comes to the Father but by Me”. Believing this information about God, and excluding all other information about God drastically shortens the information search for all other truth.

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