Information News

Curious: An addiction to pure information … ?

Spread the love

That’s what driving while “intexticated” seems to be:

An auto safety site in the United States claims that 23% of auto accidents in 2011 involved a cell phone.

If correct, that should be no surprise. The minimum distraction is 5 sec, which is just enough to close the “window of opportunity” that our driving instructors told us about—the few seconds when we can avoid an anticipated crash.

Fifty-five percent of young adult drivers think it is easy to text while driving, but 10% were found, when studied, to be driving outside their lane at the time.

No wonder they call it “driving while intexticated”: Social media addiction comes, like other addictions, with a free I-deny-I-have-a-problem package.

A problem yes. But with texting while driving, the substance that causes the addiction seems to be pure information. Not chemicals.

Thoughts?

See also: Introducing information, and why it matters

One Reply to “Curious: An addiction to pure information … ?

  1. 1
    Robert Byers says:

    Is it possible those talking more on cells would talk more with people sitting in the car? not the cell but the distraction. Are their studies of accidents done with talking in the car?
    I suspect this cell phone fear /crash thing is not true. It just pinpoints those persons easily distracted or who are always not paying attention.
    Those people who cell and drive are not tested for accidents unless they are in accidents. I question the methodology here. Picked up the habit somewhere.

Leave a Reply