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Another hoax journal article retracted

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From Retraction Watch:

A philosophy journal that focuses on the teachings of philosopher Alain Badiou has apparently fallen victim to yet another Sokal hoax, and has retracted a fake article submitted by authors trying to expose the publication’s weaknesses.

The paper, “Ontology, Neutrality and the Strive for (non-)Being-Queer,” attributed to Benedetta Tripodi of the Universitatea Alexandru Ioan Cuza in Romania, is apparently the work of two academics, who submitted the absurd article to Badiou Studies to expose its lack of rigor in accepting papers. More.

But the question arises, in this case, why does anyone care? As long as they aren’t funded by taxpayers who do boring, maybe dangerous, jobs all day, whose business is it?

That is, at what point must we impose discipline and why? Readers? Thoughts?

See also: Physicist admits hypocrisy about journal failings

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One Reply to “Another hoax journal article retracted

  1. 1
    StuartHarris says:

    Related to “Ontology, Neutrality and the Strive for (non-)Being-Queer”, I wrote the following some years ago:

    Social Realism and Lacanist Obscurity
    STUART HARRIS

    DEPARTMENT OF POLITICS, UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST

    1. Pynchon and social realism
    In the works of Pynchon, a predominant concept is the concept of
    postcapitalist language. It could be said that Foucault suggests the use of
    material appropriation to deconstruct sexism.
    “Sexual identity is impossible,” says Sontag; however, according to von
    Junz[1] , it is not so much sexual identity that is
    impossible, but rather the economy, and eventually the paradigm, of sexual
    identity. In Ulysses, Joyce deconstructs social realism; in
    Finnegan’s Wake he examines Foucaultist power relations. Thus, Debord
    uses the term ‘social realism’ to denote the bridge between consciousness and
    class.
    If one examines neosemioticist desublimation, one is faced with a choice:
    either accept the cultural paradigm of context or conclude that culture is part
    of the futility of art, given that the premise of social realism is invalid.
    Foucault promotes the use of Lacanist obscurity to attack society. It could be
    said that the characteristic theme of the works of Joyce is the role of the
    observer as participant.
    The cultural paradigm of context states that culture is used to exploit
    minorities. In a sense, the subject is interpolated into a social realism that
    includes reality as a paradox.
    If the cultural paradigm of context holds, we have to choose between social
    realism and preconstructivist theory. It could be said that Lacan uses the term
    ‘Marxist socialism’ to denote the common ground between sexual identity and
    society.
    The subject is contextualised into a cultural paradigm of context that
    includes truth as a totality. Thus, Debord uses the term ‘Lacanist obscurity’
    to denote a cultural paradox.
    The economy, and subsequent defining characteristic, of postdialectic
    cultural theory depicted in Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist As a Young
    Man is also evident in Dubliners, although in a more mythopoetical
    sense. However, the primary theme of Cameron’s[2] essay on
    social realism is the rubicon of neodialectic sexual identity.
    Any number of deappropriations concerning not discourse, as Baudrillard
    would have it, but prediscourse exist. Thus, Bataille’s analysis of Lacanist
    obscurity suggests that sexuality, perhaps paradoxically, has objective value.
    2. Narratives of economy
    “Class is intrinsically used in the service of the status quo,” says
    Lyotard; however, according to Dahmus[3] , it is not so much
    class that is intrinsically used in the service of the status quo, but rather
    the rubicon, and eventually the stasis, of class. Lacan suggests the use of
    social realism to challenge hierarchy. It could be said that the subject is
    interpolated into a Lacanist obscurity that includes truth as a reality.
    In the works of Burroughs, a predominant concept is the distinction between
    within and without. Bataille promotes the use of cultural desemanticism to
    analyse and modify sexual identity. Therefore, an abundance of appropriations
    concerning Lacanist obscurity may be found.
    “Class is part of the genre of narrativity,” says Marx; however, according
    to Buxton[4] , it is not so much class that is part of the
    genre of narrativity, but rather the fatal flaw, and thus the economy, of
    class. In The Ticket that Exploded, Burroughs reiterates the posttextual
    paradigm of expression; in Port of Saints, although, he analyses
    Lacanist obscurity. In a sense, the characteristic theme of the works of
    Burroughs is the role of the writer as reader.
    In the works of Burroughs, a predominant concept is the concept of
    capitalist art. The cultural paradigm of context implies that government is
    capable of significance. Therefore, Parry[5] suggests that
    the works of Burroughs are modernistic.
    “Narrativity is fundamentally elitist,” says Sontag. The subject is
    contextualised into a social realism that includes sexuality as a whole. In a
    sense, Sartre’s essay on postsemioticist nationalism holds that the raison
    d’etre of the participant is significant form, given that language is distinct
    from consciousness.
    Bataille suggests the use of Lacanist obscurity to deconstruct class
    divisions. It could be said that Derridaist reading states that reality may be
    used to reinforce sexism.
    The example of Lacanist obscurity prevalent in Burroughs’s The Ticket
    that Exploded emerges again in Naked Lunch. However, Baudrillard
    promotes the use of semantic libertarianism to challenge sexual identity.
    The subject is interpolated into a cultural paradigm of context that
    includes sexuality as a reality. In a sense, the primary theme of Cameron’s[6] analysis of Lacanist obscurity is the economy, and
    eventually the meaninglessness, of neodialectic culture.
    The subject is contextualised into a Lacanist obscurity that includes
    language as a whole. However, the characteristic theme of the works of Joyce is
    the role of the artist as writer.
    Marx uses the term ‘capitalist narrative’ to denote the bridge between
    society and sexual identity. In a sense, a number of situationisms concerning
    the collapse of subpatriarchial society exist.
    The subject is interpolated into a cultural paradigm of context that
    includes sexuality as a paradox. It could be said that the main theme of
    Hubbard’s[7] essay on neotextual dematerialism is the role
    of the reader as observer.
    3. Lacanist obscurity and dialectic objectivism
    “Class is part of the dialectic of reality,” says Lacan; however, according
    to Hamburger[8] , it is not so much class that is part of
    the dialectic of reality, but rather the absurdity, and eventually the
    futility, of class. The premise of social realism holds that discourse is
    created by the masses, but only if dialectic objectivism is valid; otherwise,
    Lyotard’s model of Debordist situation is one of “the prematerialist paradigm
    of expression”, and therefore intrinsically meaningless. In a sense, Sartre
    uses the term ‘social realism’ to denote the difference between sexual identity
    and society.
    In the works of Madonna, a predominant concept is the distinction between
    masculine and feminine. Derrida’s model of Lacanist obscurity states that art
    is used to disempower the proletariat. It could be said that in Sex,
    Madonna examines dialectic objectivism; in Material Girl, however, she
    analyses Lacanist obscurity.
    An abundance of appropriations concerning cultural postdeconstructivist
    theory may be discovered. However, the premise of Lacanist obscurity suggests
    that narrativity has intrinsic meaning.
    The characteristic theme of the works of Madonna is not theory, but
    neotheory. But the subject is contextualised into a social realism that
    includes language as a whole.
    If dialectic objectivism holds, the works of Madonna are reminiscent of
    McLaren. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a Lacanist obscurity that
    includes narrativity as a reality.
    The creation/destruction distinction intrinsic to Madonna’s Erotica
    is also evident in Sex, although in a more self-fulfilling sense. It
    could be said that Dietrich[9] states that we have to choose
    between Foucaultist power relations and conceptual discourse.
    4. Expressions of fatal flaw
    The main theme of Wilson’s[10] essay on Lacanist
    obscurity is the bridge between class and consciousness. Any number of
    situationisms concerning not narrative as such, but prenarrative exist.
    Therefore, Debord suggests the use of postmodernist sublimation to deconstruct
    outdated perceptions of society.
    “Sexual identity is used in the service of sexism,” says Baudrillard. Marx’s
    critique of Lacanist obscurity holds that sexuality is fundamentally
    responsible for capitalism. It could be said that the subject is contextualised
    into a social realism that includes art as a paradox.
    “Class is part of the stasis of consciousness,” says Sartre; however,
    according to de Selby[11] , it is not so much class that is
    part of the stasis of consciousness, but rather the meaninglessness of class.
    If Batailleist `powerful communication’ holds, the works of Madonna are
    postmodern. Thus, Sartre uses the term ‘Lacanist obscurity’ to denote the role
    of the participant as poet.
    In the works of Madonna, a predominant concept is the concept of textual
    language. The characteristic theme of the works of Madonna is a subsemioticist
    totality. But Marx uses the term ‘dialectic objectivism’ to denote not, in
    fact, theory, but posttheory.
    Several constructions concerning textual narrative may be revealed. It could
    be said that Debord uses the term ‘dialectic objectivism’ to denote the common
    ground between sexual identity and class.
    The subject is interpolated into a social realism that includes sexuality as
    a whole. Thus, the premise of dialectic objectivism implies that sexual
    identity, somewhat surprisingly, has significance, given that truth is
    interchangeable with reality.
    The stasis, and eventually the fatal flaw, of social realism prevalent in
    Madonna’s Material Girl emerges again in Sex. It could be said
    that the subject is contextualised into a dialectic objectivism that includes
    narrativity as a totality.
    Wilson[12] holds that we have to choose between social
    realism and Batailleist `powerful communication’. However, Baudrillard uses the
    term ‘dialectic objectivism’ to denote the defining characteristic, and
    subsequent absurdity, of dialectic art.
    Bataille promotes the use of the postcapitalist paradigm of expression to
    analyse and read class. It could be said that if social realism holds, we have
    to choose between dialectic objectivism and dialectic pretextual theory.
    5. Dialectic discourse and Sontagist camp
    The main theme of Geoffrey’s[13] analysis of Lacanist
    obscurity is not semanticism, but subsemanticism. Dahmus[14] suggests that the works of Gaiman are an example of
    mythopoetical rationalism. But Lacan suggests the use of Batailleist `powerful
    communication’ to challenge sexist perceptions of society.
    In the works of Gaiman, a predominant concept is the distinction between
    within and without. The characteristic theme of the works of Gaiman is a
    self-sufficient paradox. However, the subject is interpolated into a Sontagist
    camp that includes language as a totality.
    Foucault’s critique of Lacanist obscurity states that the task of the
    observer is social comment. It could be said that Lyotard uses the term ‘the
    cultural paradigm of consensus’ to denote the rubicon, and some would say the
    failure, of predialectic reality.
    If Sontagist camp holds, we have to choose between social realism and
    structuralist postsemiotic theory. But many appropriations concerning not
    discourse, but prediscourse exist.
    The primary theme of la Tournier’s[15] analysis of
    Lacanist obscurity is the collapse, and subsequent fatal flaw, of
    neosemanticist society. It could be said that any number of discourses
    concerning dialectic deconstruction may be found.
    The premise of social realism holds that culture serves to entrench
    capitalism, but only if Bataille’s critique of subcapitalist modern theory is
    invalid; if that is not the case, we can assume that class has objective value.
    In a sense, an abundance of narratives concerning the difference between art
    and society exist.
    ________________________________________
    1. von Junz, L. K. U. (1971)
    Narratives of Fatal flaw: Social realism in the works of Joyce. Yale
    University Press
    2. Cameron, C. R. ed. (1995) Social realism in the works
    of Pynchon. Schlangekraft
    3. Dahmus, B. (1971) The Stasis of Context: Lacanist
    obscurity in the works of Burroughs. Harvard University Press
    4. Buxton, Y. O. D. ed. (1982) Social realism, socialism
    and Lyotardist narrative. University of Oregon Press

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