News Peer review

Red wine researcher fabricates masses of data …

Spread the love

 

File:A small cup of coffee.JPG

Glad we found the coffee graphic again. Knew we’d need it.

Speaking of research fraud …. In “Well This is Darn Annoying” (Powerline, January 12, 2012), Steven Hayward reports,

I’ve long been a believer, on intuitive, metaphysical, and Platonic grounds, in the theory that red wine is good for your health (says the PL blogger current quaffing a westside Paso Sangiovese right now out here on the Left Coast), but today comes the disconcerting news that one of the leading researchers behind the “resveratrol hypothesis” has been massively fabricating his data for years:

A University of Connecticut researcher who studied the link between aging and a substance found in red wine has committed more than 100 acts of data fabrication and falsification, the university said Wednesday, throwing much of his work into doubt.

What the hell? Who does this guy think he is—a climate scientist??

Surely this is a much more serious crime than the climate stuff, non? La guillotine, no less!!

And when they get round to coffee … Islamic justice!!

4 Replies to “Red wine researcher fabricates masses of data …

  1. 1
    champignon says:

    I’ll be he’s a Darwinist, infected by the nihilistic philosophy that Gil and KF are so bravely warning us against.

  2. 2
    champignon says:

    I’ll be -> I’ll bet

  3. 3
    Barb says:

    It would be hard to say whether or not he’s a Darwinist without evidence, champignon.

    However, and any intellectually honest person would have to admit this, science cannot claim the moral high ground when scientists such as this commit acts of fraud. If science is a search for truth, as Linus Pauling felt it was, then scientists themselves are obligated to be honest.

    Oh, and nihilistic philosophy argues that there’s no purpose in life, thus rendering concepts of bad and good as meaningless, so it’s plausible that he might subscribe to this philosophy.

  4. 4
    Joe says:

    Apparently wine and research do not mix. 🙂

Leave a Reply