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AM-Nat 2016 Conference Open for Registration

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AM-Nat 2016 Conferene
I am pleased to announce that the Alternatives to Methodological Naturalism 2016 online conference (AM-Nat) is now open for registration. The conference is online, so everyone who wants to attend should be able to do so easily. You Can register here at out early bird price of $20.

The current list of topics include a great variety of subjects, including:

  • Alternative Modes of Inquiry than Naturalism
  • Naturalism and Epistemology
  • Naturalism in Linguistics
  • Naturalism and evolution

We are still accepting new topic submissions. See our call for abstracts. If you are involved in a field of study that you think is better served by not holding onto methodological naturalism, please submit an abstract to share it with the rest of us!

We have had a number of abstract submissions, so we may have to expand the conference either into two tracks, or to two days. In any case, thank you everyone for your support, and I’m looking forward to seeing you all at the conference!

5 Replies to “AM-Nat 2016 Conference Open for Registration

  1. 1
    johnnyb says:

    For those interested, you can read the proceedings from our previous conference (which dealt with similar topics) here.

  2. 2
    johnnyb says:

    A few areas where I would *love* to see abstract submissions for would be (a) psychology, (b) macroeconomics, and (c) microeconomics. All of these have very interesting relationships with naturalism, and exploring alternative approaches outside of naturalism would be extremely helpful to those disciplines.

    I am very excited about the abstracts we have so far, and am looking forward to all of the talks!

  3. 3
    Mung says:

    That’s awesome. I could do a paper on econocomics I guess, but first I should probably learn to balance my checkbook.

  4. 4
    Bob O'H says:

    johnnyb – I’m curious to know what you have in mind in economics. (the invisible hand, maybe?)

  5. 5
    johnnyb says:

    Bob –

    Not the invisible hand, but rather the importance of creativity in economics. Two good reads on the subject are Gilder’s “Knowledge and Power” for a macroeconomic view and Thiel’s “Zero to One” for a microeconomic view. Gilder’s deals more in the theory than Thiel does (Thiel is focusing on making a practical business book), but both of them move the importance of economics from static models to dynamic, unpredictable, creativity-oriented models.

    I guess this is related to the invisible hand in a way, since it makes the hand visible – it is all of the ingenuity and creativity of the entrepreneurs that make the invisible hand work, rather than viewing the invisible hand as something automatic.

    Along these lines, Austrian economics has always claimed itself to be “methodologically dualistic”, though I am not sure how far Austrian economists themselves take that, and would like to hear from an actual Austrian economist what that looks like in practice. From what I understand, a lot of the methodological dualism that used to be present in Austrian economics has been replaced by evolutionary psychology, and I would be interested to see if there was anyone who wanted to reverse course on this.

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