Human evolution

Is there a genuine conflict between archaeology and genomics?

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From Ewen Callaway at Nature:

A study analysing genome-wide data from 170 ancient Europeans, including 100 associated with Bell Beaker-style artefacts, suggested that the people who had built the barrow and buried their dead there had all but vanished by 2000 BC. The genetic ancestry of Neolithic Britons, according to the study, was almost entirely displaced. Yet somehow the new arrivals carried on with many of the Britons’ traditions. “That didn’t fit for me,” says Carlin, who has been struggling to reconcile his research with the DNA findings. More.

Maybe the later Britons learned something from their predecessors? Or is that not an allowed assumption any more?

One Reply to “Is there a genuine conflict between archaeology and genomics?

  1. 1
    awstar says:

    From source article

    Changes in pottery styles there sometimes echoed distant trends in continental Europe, such as the appearance of bell-shaped beakers — a connection that signals the arrival of new ideas and people in Britain.

    I wonder why these scientists hadn’t jumped to the conclusion there was convergent evolution of pot beakers?

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