Intelligent Design Neuroscience

Christian Scientific Society talks on human exceptionalism (2017) now online

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The Christian Scientific Society From David Snoke at the Christian Scientific Society:

Jack Collins presented a compelling argument for an “attribute” view of the image of God, that is, a view that the image of God means that we have attributes that are like God in some ways that animals aren’t. …

Jeff Schwartz presented a lively and controversial discussion of mindfulness. We all learned what it is, how it is being taken very seriously by modern psychiatrists of all stripes, and how the data shows that it involves distinct states of the brain that can be identified. In a nutshell, mindfulness has three parts:

Mike Egnor gave a talk full of brain science data in support of his position of Aristotelean dualism. He contrasted his position with Cartesian dualism, which has two distinct substances, one which is fully material and deterministic, and another which is spiritual and in another realm, which somehow interfaces with the brain. He argued Cartesian dualism actually just leads to materialism, as the spiritual substance gets ignored. By contrast, his view of Aristotelean dualism posits eternal “forms” associated with every material thing. For humans, the essence of this form is what we would call the spirit. I don’t fully understand this view, but here’s how I visualize it, using an example Mike brought up: a chair consists physically of atoms and molecules. If we destroy a chair, we do not destroy the atoms and molecules, that is, the material of the chair, but we destroy the “form” of the chair. What we call a chair is not the purely physical, but the particular pattern of organization of the chair. Going up one higher level, there is a general concept we may call “chairness” which transcends any individual chair. This general concept can exist, in Aristotle’s view, independent of any matter, just as one might argue the natural numbers 1, 2, 3, … “exist” whether or not I have one, two, or three actual things. At an even higher level, one could then argue that the unique nature of an individual person could exist at this level, independently of matter; in other words, not just the general concept of “person-ness,” but the essential and unique nature of “David Snoke-ness.” It’s an intriguing, and decidedly non-modern, way of thinking. (member access only)More.

See also: What Thomas Aquinas can teach modern neuroscientists (Barry Arrington)

4 Replies to “Christian Scientific Society talks on human exceptionalism (2017) now online

  1. 1
    J-Mac says:

    a chair consists physically of atoms and molecules. If we destroy a chair, we do not destroy the atoms and molecules, that is, the material of the chair, but we destroy the “form” of the chair. What we call a chair is not the purely physical, but the particular pattern of organization of the chair. Going up one higher level, there is a general concept we may call “chairness” which transcends any individual chair. This general concept can exist, in Aristotle’s view, independent of any matter, just as one might argue the natural numbers 1, 2, 3, … “exist” whether or not I have one, two, or three actual things. At an even higher level, one could then argue that the unique nature of an individual person could exist at this level, independently of matter; in other words, not just the general concept of “person-ness,” but the essential and unique nature of “David Snoke-ness.” It’s an intriguing, and decidedly non-modern, way of thinking.

    “Niels Bohr, a Danish Physicist who made significant contributions to understanding atomic structure and quantum theory once said:

    “if quantum mechanics hasn’t profoundly shocked you, you haven’t understood it yet.”

    Quantum physics has left scientists all over the world baffled, especially with the discovery that our physical material reality, isn’t really physical at all. “Everything we call real is made of things that cannot be regarded as real.” It seems philosophers of our ancient past were right, our senses really do deceive us.

    Again, our physical material reality really ISN’T physical at all. It’s an arrangement of 3 sub-particles plus dark energy…

  2. 2
    ScuzzaMan says:

    “Everything we call real is made of things that cannot be regarded as real.”

    A nice quote from Hebrews 11:3

  3. 3
    J-Mac says:

    A nice quote from Hebrews 11:3

    Actually it’s Neils Bohr’s quote but it is pretty close to Heb 11:3 🙂

    http://www.goodreads.com/quote.....hat-cannot

  4. 4
    ScuzzaMan says:

    Thanks J-Mac.

    I suspected it was not a direct quote. I’ve seen many different translations but nothing matching that but wasn’t sure what term to use. Perhaps “reformulation” would be closer?

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