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Pond hydra can modify its own genetic program

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pond hydra/Brigitte Galliot
But then this is the same life form that can reassemble from a small piece, and lose all its neurons but live. Re the latter feat, new findings may shed light:

From Science Daily:

Champion of regeneration, the freshwater polyp Hydra is capable of reforming a complete individual from any fragment of its body. It is even able to remain alive when all its neurons have disappeared. Researcher the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, have discovered how: cells of the epithelial type modify their genetic program by overexpressing a series of genes, among which some are involved in diverse nervous functions.

“Epithelial cells do not possess typical neuronal functions. However, Hydra’s loss of neurogenesis induces epithelial cells to modify their genetic program accordingly, indicating that they are ready to assume some of these functions. These “naturally” genetically modified epithelial cells are thus likely to enhance their sensitivity and response to environmental signals, to partially compensate for the lack of nervous system,” explains Wanda Buzgariu, co-first author of the article. The detail of these new functions remains to be discovered, as well as how epithelial cells proceed to overexpress these genes and thus adapt their genetic program. More.

See also: Pond hydra makes use of light without having eyes

Here’s the abstract:

Hydra continuously differentiates a sophisticated nervous system made of mechanosensory cells (nematocytes) and sensory–motor and ganglionic neurons from interstitial stem cells. However, this dynamic adult neurogenesis is dispensable for morphogenesis. Indeed animals depleted of their interstitial stem cells and interstitial progenitors lose their active behaviours but maintain their developmental fitness, and regenerate and bud when force-fed. To characterize the impact of the loss of neurogenesis in Hydra, we first performed transcriptomic profiling at five positions along the body axis. We found neurogenic genes predominantly expressed along the central body column, which contains stem cells and progenitors, and neurotransmission genes predominantly expressed at the extremities, where the nervous system is dense. Next, we performed transcriptomics on animals depleted of their interstitial cells by hydroxyurea, colchicine or heat-shock treatment. By crossing these results with cell-type-specific transcriptomics, we identified epithelial genes up-regulated upon loss of neurogenesis: transcription factors (Dlx, Dlx1, DMBX1/Manacle, Ets1, Gli3, KLF11, LMX1A, ZNF436, Shox1), epitheliopeptides (Arminins, PW peptide), neurosignalling components (CAMK1D, DDCl2, Inx1), ligand-ion channel receptors (CHRNA1, NaC7), G-Protein Coupled Receptors and FMRFRL. Hence epitheliomuscular cells seemingly enhance their sensing ability when neurogenesis is compromised. This unsuspected plasticity might reflect the extended multifunctionality of epithelial-like cells in early eumetazoan evolution. Open access – Y. Wenger, W. Buzgariu, B. Galliot. Loss of neurogenesis in Hydra leads to compensatory regulation of neurogenic and neurotransmission genes in epithelial cells. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, November 2015 DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2015.0040

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6 Replies to “Pond hydra can modify its own genetic program

  1. 1
    Mapou says:

    “Epithelial cells do not possess typical neuronal functions. However, Hydra’s loss of neurogenesis induces epithelial cells to modify their genetic program accordingly, indicating that they are ready to assume some of these functions. These “naturally” genetically modified epithelial cells are thus likely to enhance their sensitivity and response to environmental signals, to partially compensate for the lack of nervous system,” explains Wanda Buzgariu, co-first author of the article.

    Interesting. I wonder why he has “naturally” between scare quotes. At any rate, the ability to self-program in response to environmental stimuli is not RM+NS. It’s intelligently programmed adaptation. There is no need for RM+NS. Nothing Darwinian is required for the hydra to survive.

  2. 2
    NickMatzke_UD says:

    Sounds like the DNA didn’t change, just the gene expression. Most people would therefore conclude the “genetic program” did *not* change here. The exceptions would be naive press and naive creationists.

  3. 3
    Mapou says:

    Nick:

    Sounds like the DNA didn’t change, just the gene expression. Most people would therefore conclude the “genetic program” did *not* change here. The exceptions would be naive press and naive creationists.

    There can be no doubt that there was DNA modification since gene expression is controlled by higher level regulatory genes. It’s obvious that the regulatory genes must be modified in order to effect either the expression or suppression of other genes. Something changed genetically and it was not due to RM+NS. That is the point, Matzke.

    Conclusion: Darwinism is a third-rate cult based on pseudoscience, wishful thinking, fear and superstition.

  4. 4
    Virgil Cain says:

    Matzke’s position cannot explain DNA nor its regulation. And we know that bothers you, Nick.

  5. 5
    Mung says:

    Nick the Naive.

    Doesn’t know how to calculate the size of amino acid sequence space but knows how to make it smaller. Magic.

  6. 6
    Peer says:

    This is easily explained as epigenetic reprogramming.

    As a matter of fact, evolutionism has its basis in this sort of mechanisms and stems from 19th century ignorance.

    Understanding epigenetics makes Darwin obsolete.

    The genome is self-adjusting and self-adapting to change. That is now proven beyond any doubt.

    For a realistic approach to understand the whole of biological changes check out the Baranome hypothesis, and the VIGE-first hypothesis.

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