Cell biology Intelligent Design

Why do cells care if they break when rocks don’t?

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A look at the intricacies of cell proofreading and repair reveals a stark fact:

Rocks don’t care if they break. The very concepts of proofreading and repair imply accuracy for a purpose. In cells, complex multi-part machines find errors and fix them. Is this not evidence of intentionality and programming? As these new research papers show, the machines involved show exquisite craftsmanship and efficient action to keep other parts — machines outside their own structural needs — humming along.

How can they do that? How do they know? They bear an uncanny resemblance to surgeons or linemen that are trained as first responders to potentially catastrophic situations, and yet they work robotically in the dark without eyes or brains. Such things do not just appear by blind material processes. Proofreading and repair systems had to be operational from the beginning of life, because considering the lethal consequences without them, it’s hard to conceive of any primitive organism surviving, let alone progressing up an evolutionary ladder. Now, behold in wonder what is going on in our cells. Evolution News,

In Cells, Proofreading and Repair Testify to Intelligent Design and Foresight” at Evolution News and Science Today

How does life come to want to keep on existing—whether it succeeds or not? If a drive to survive is “programmed” into life, how did that come to be? Most of nature has no such drive.

4 Replies to “Why do cells care if they break when rocks don’t?

  1. 1
    polistra says:

    Excellent writing.

    It’s ironic (or paradoxical, or something…) that we’re finding these mechanisms at a time when most people have lost contact with the whole idea of repair. Before we offshored industry to China, most people dealt with adjusting and fixing things around the house, and more workers were involved with making and repairing and quality control. At that time we didn’t understand that the same processes were going on inside every cell. Now that we’ve forgotten how the process feels, we’re realizing that our innards DIDN’T forget. Maybe we can learn something from our glia and mitochondria, but probably not.

  2. 2
    martin_r says:

    Polistra @1 “most people dealt with adjusting and fixing things around the house,”

    you see ?

    PEOPLE deal with adjusting and fixing things.

    Let me repeat that:

    PEOPLE

    PEOPLE

    PEOPLE

    INTELLIGENT PEOPLE …. WHO KNOW WHAT TO DO (most of them) , how to fix/repair things.
    but, first, YOU NEED TO RECOGNIZE THAT IT IS BROKEN!

    A cell repairs everything by a FULLY automated processes. There is no repair guy, no mind who recognizes what is broken and how to fix it. There is no supervision. The system obviously knows, what is the desired state. But how does it know ?

    A BAD DESIGN ?

    Only a biologist (natural science graduate) can call it a bad design.

    THIS IS AN ENGINEERING SCI-FI, self-maintaining systems, self-repairing systems,…

    PS: could some Darwinian clown (e.g. Seversky) explain to me, how an unguided natural process does know that something is broken, in other words, how does the process know, that this is not the proper state and that it needs to be fixed ? Why something needs to be fixed in a world of unguided natural process where is no foresight ?

  3. 3
    Truthfreedom says:

    2 Martin_r

    PS: could some Darwinian clown (e.g. Seversky) explain …

    I think he is busy buying a new clown’s nose. The last one got worn out.

  4. 4
    awstar says:

    Martin_r at 2

    … explain to me, how an unguided natural process does know that something is broken, in other words, how does the process know, that this is not the proper state and that it needs to be fixed? Why something needs to be fixed in a world of unguided natural process where is no foresight ?

    As long as they are explaining how an unguided natural process “knows” that something is broken, can they tell me at what point an evolved process starts trying to repair what has already evolved instead of just continuing to evolve — empowered by genetic typos and natural selection (i.e. death).

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