Culture Darwinism Intelligent Design

ID conference intended for Portugal had to flee to Spain

Spread the love

From Paul Nelson at Evolution News & Views:

A group of students at the University of the Algarve, in Faro, Portugal, wanted to have a one-day conference on ID at the university. They invited Professor Marcos Eberlin of Campinas State University in Brazil (the 2016 Thomson Medal winner) and me, to speak. The conference was scheduled for Monday, October 23, with university endorsement.

Then, as soon as the conference was advertised, outside pressure began to stop it. On September 22, we received word that the event had been cancelled by the university. Score this as Cancellation Number One. …

So they ended up, after a second Portuguese cancellation, at a hotel in Spain.

I am so proud of the students who climbed into a bus in Faro on Saturday morning, drove to Porto to pick up some friends, then on to León — and then went back again on the same night of the conference. That is an almost 2000-kilometer round trip. More.

Good for young folk to learn early: In a Darwinian setting, academics prove their worth by shutting down discussions of the shortcomings of the system. The academics don’t need to achieve much because they can piffle to each other for decades as long as they all agree to protect the racket.

The main thing is to somehow get the degree without ever becoming like them.

See also: ID conference in Portugal, October 23, 2017

and Can science survive long in a post-modern world? It’s not clear.

3 Replies to “ID conference intended for Portugal had to flee to Spain

  1. 1
    Origenes says:

    The enemy is very determined; no-holds-barred. Well, that’s good to know.

  2. 2
    Dionisio says:

    Insecurity sometimes may lead some people to actions that suppress information.

    Apparently in the late 1970s many people in Russia weren’t aware of the name Alexander Solzhenitsyn, simply because that name was not mentioned often in the official media.

    However, in those same years many people in other countries had heard of that Russian writer, who had won a Nobel Prize at the beginning of that same decade.

    Why such a difference in access to information?

  3. 3
    Dionisio says:

    In the early 1980s many people in a country in the American continent weren’t aware of the events that were taking place in a particular area of Eastern Europe in those same days, because the information -available to many people in the rest of that continent- was very limited in the official media of that country.
    However, by the start of the following decade, the same ignored events led to historical sociopolitical changes that directly affected that American nation very badly.
    Now that’s documented in history for anybody to read.
    What caused such a limitation of information?
    Insecurity?

Leave a Reply