Intelligent Design Origin Of Life

Origin of life clue is seen in chemical droplets that divide

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The formation of droplets that divide into lesser droplets is, we are told, “a big achievement that suggests that “the general phenomenology of life formation is a lot easier than one might think.”

Now, the new work by David Zwicker and collaborators at the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems and the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, both in Dresden, suggests an answer. The scientists studied the physics of “chemically active” droplets, which cycle chemicals in and out of the surrounding fluid, and discovered that these droplets tend to grow to cell size and divide, just like cells. This “active droplet” behavior differs from the passive and more familiar tendencies of oil droplets in water, which glom together into bigger and bigger droplets without ever dividing.

If chemically active droplets can grow to a set size and divide of their own accord, then “it makes it more plausible that there could have been spontaneous emergence of life from nonliving soup,” said Frank Jülicher, a biophysicist in Dresden and a co-author of the new paper.

The findings, reported in Nature Physics last month, paint a possible picture of life’s start by explaining “how cells made daughters,” said Zwicker, who is now a postdoctoral researcher at Harvard University. “This is, of course, key if you want to think about evolution.” …

However, David Deamer, a biochemist at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and a longtime champion of the membrane-first hypothesis, argues that while the newfound mechanism of droplet division is interesting, its relevance to the origin of life remains to be seen. The mechanism is a far cry, he noted, from the complicated, multistep process by which modern cells divide.

Natalie Wolchover, “Dividing Droplets Could Explain Life’s Origin” at Quanta

Complex, multistep processes don’t matter. The selling feature is “a possible picture” of “how cells made daughters.”

The Narrative does all the rest.


See also: The Science Fictions series at your fingertips – origin of life What we do and don’t know about the origin of life.

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Cells and proteins use sugars to talk to one another Cells are like Neanderthal man. They get smarter every time we run into them. And just think, it all just tumbled into existence by natural selection acting on random mutations (Darwinism) too…

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3 Replies to “Origin of life clue is seen in chemical droplets that divide

  1. 1
    EDTA says:

    >“it makes it more plausible that there could have been spontaneous emergence of life from nonliving soup,”

    Too bad it doesn’t make it more probable.

  2. 2
    kairosfocus says:

    H’mm:

    If chemically active droplets can grow to a set size and divide of their own accord, then “it makes it more plausible that there could have been spontaneous emergence of life from nonliving soup,” said Frank Jülicher, a biophysicist in Dresden and a co-author of the new paper.

    I think I am missing a few steps there given the complexity of cells and what we know is happening in division.

    Could someone please fill in on the basis for claimed plausibility?

    KF

  3. 3
    Fasteddious says:

    I recall reading about this sort of thing decades ago – coacervates – so what is new about it?
    https://uncommondescent.com/intelligent-design/yes-oparins-coacervates-again/
    James Tour has eviscerated this sort of simplistic, deceitful OOL publishing in his recent videos. For example:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zU7Lww-sBPg

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