Artificial Intelligence Intelligent Design Mind Naturalism Philosophy

A philosopher explains how you can know for sure that you are not a sim

As philosopher Richard Johns explains, sims do not understand simhood: How can Alice determine whether the strange little man in her apartment who claims to be her Programmer is telling the truth? Recently, philosopher Richard Johns (left), whose work was profiled here at Mind Matters News in “A philosopher explains why thinking matter is impossible,” Read More…

Artificial Intelligence Mind

Has any “thinking machine” passed the Lovelace test?

Surprising results from computer programs do not equate to creativity, says computer scientist Selmer Bringsjord. Is there such a thing as machine creativity? The feats of machines like AlphaGo are due to superior computational power, not to creativity at originating new ideas. Computer scientist Selmer Bringsjord sees the ability to write, say, a novel of Read More…

Artificial Intelligence Intelligent Design Mind

How the Lovelace test raises the stakes for thinking machines

The Turing test has had a free ride in science media for far too long, says an AI expert: In the view of Rensselaer philosopher and computer scientist Selmer Bringsjord, the iconic Turing test for human-like intelligence in computers is inadequate and easily gamed. Merely sounding enough like a human to fool people does not Read More…

Artificial Intelligence Intelligent Design Mind Naturalism

Eric Holloway: A scientific test for true intelligence

A scientific test should identify precisely what humans can do that computers cannot, avoiding subjective opinion: The “broken checkerboard” is not the ultimate scientific test for intelligence that we need. But it is a truly scientific test in the sense that it is capable of falsifying the theory that the mind is reducible to computation. Read More…

Artificial Intelligence Intelligent Design Mind Naturalism

Eric Holloway: The Turing test is unscientific

Holloway: This test for intelligence, the Turing Test, was invented by and named after the mid-twentieth century computer pioneer Alan Turing. It is a subjective test in that it depends on whether an artificial intelligence is capable of convincing human testers that it is a human. But fooling humans, while impressive, is not really the same thing as actually possessing human-level intelligence.

Artificial Intelligence Intelligent Design Mind Naturalism

Michael Egnor: Jeffrey Shallit, a computer scientist, doesn’t know how computers work

Egnor: It’s remarkable that Dr. Shallit—a professor of computer science—doesn’t understand computation. Materialism is a kind of intellectual disability that afflicts even the well-educated. To put it simply, machines don’t and can’t think. Dr. Shallit’s wristwatch doesn’t know what time it is.