Denyse O'Leary is the News blogger for Uncommon Descent
Evolution Intelligent Design

David Tyler asks, “How SHOULD the NSF measure scientific literacy?”

At Access Research Network (7/22/11). And offers an answer: For 20 years, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has undertaken surveys of science literacy that incorporate these two true-false statements: “Human beings, as we know them today, developed from earlier species of animals”, and “The universe began with a huge explosion”. Happily, changes have been recommended, Read More…

Education Intelligent Design Science

Darwin in the schools: Canadians are always at their worst when playing “me too!”

According to the US Darwin lobby, the Canadian Society for Ecology and Evolution Adds its Voice for Evolution: The chorus of support for the teaching of evolution continues, with a statement from the Canadian Society for Ecology and Evolution, which works to promote the study of ecology and evolution in Canada and to raise public Read More…

Evolution Intelligent Design

What might the recent treasure trove from the Ice Age in North America tell us?

Troy Hooper reports on the discovery of “the finest mastodon site in the world” in Colorado in 2010 in “Curtains close on scientifically significant Snowmass bone dig …’” (Real Aspen, July 10, 2011): The fossil excavation at Ziegler Reservoir came to a close a couple of days ago, yielding an Ice Age ecosystem of 4,826 Read More…

Intelligent Design

Texas school board hearings: Startling gains in the hard science of citation bluffing are now widely noted

Like any member of the tenured entitlement class, University of Texas microbiologist Andy Ellington, is entitled to facts that support his beliefs. Providing such facts is easier than in the past, thanks to the great gains made by the science of citation bluffing. In “Andy Ellington’s Citation Bluffs and the Scientific Debate Over the Miller-Urey Read More…

Intelligent Design

Soft tissue recovered from an early Cretaceous dinosaur – test of evolution theories?

Soft tissue recovered from an early Cretaceous dinosaur What if many are indistinguishable from modern lizards? Would that be like fossil rabbits in the Cambrian? Johan Lindgren et al explain the process in “Microspectroscopic Evidence of Cretaceous Bone Proteins”: The fossil record is capable of exceptional preservation and occasionally labile and decay-prone tissues, such as Read More…